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50 years ago today...

Nov. 22nd, 2013 | 05:24 pm
posted by: marauderosu in classical_music



One happier anniversary, though: Benjamin Britten was born 100 years ago today.

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(no subject)

Oct. 27th, 2013 | 04:50 pm
posted by: alex_shmurak in classical_music

френды, у кого есть ноты пьесы чарльза айвза "песня без (хороших) слов"?

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(no subject)

Oct. 21st, 2013 | 11:33 pm
posted by: roman_gurochkin in classical_music

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The 2nd quartet of A. Borodin

Sep. 10th, 2013 | 10:31 am
posted by: justmodestgirl in classical_music

Оригинал взят у justmodestgirl в The 2nd quartet of A. Borodin
Yesterday, with my mum and my sister, I went to a benefit concert of the quartet "Bohema" comprised of soloists of the Bolshoi theater.
The concert was in the cabinet of prince Golitsyn on the territory of one of the oldest hospitals of Moscow.
Within this cozy cabinet remained the atmosphere of 200 years ago: ancient books, fireplace, paints and bas-reliefs.
In the audience were about 30 people, therefore there was a real feeling of cosiness.
All works were picked up well and excellently executed, but I especially enjoyed, listening to the 2nd quartet of A. Borodin.
Each time this music forces my heart to tremble pleasantly.
The strong courageous man tells about love for the woman. This is the most harmonious alloy of the Russian and eastern melodies.
Listen, such a miracle!

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"the Russian requiem"

Sep. 1st, 2013 | 02:04 pm
posted by: justmodestgirl in classical_music

Оригинал взят у justmodestgirl в "the Russian requiem"
495801214_495801214forumtonnelSergey Taneev is a Russian composer, pianist, teacher and scientist. He was the favourite pupil and close friend of Tchaikovsky. A musician of a huge outlook, faultless taste and a man of the highest moral purity and responsibility.
Taneev's contemporaries unanimously were noting in him enormous will, optimism, surprising modesty, sincere purity, keenness and high principles of judgments, and were calling the composer "conscience of musical Moscow".
One of original hobbies of the composer was Esperanto. With it he wrote the majority of his diaries.

Taneev's composer heritage is great on scales and is varied on genres; in it are presented both the opera and the symphony, as well as original vocal lyrics. His creativity is noted for its depth and nobility of plans, its high ethics and a philosophical orientation, its restraint of the statement, and for its skill. In his compositions he gravitated to moral and philosophical themes
The cantata "St. John of Damascus" - based on the poem of Alexey Tolstoy - is deservedly recognized by "the Russian requiem". At the beginning it is possible to see the speechless desert, a mountain crevice, and a silent funeral procession. The dynamics increase gradually and reach their apocalyptic climax – the fugue " On that day when the trumpet will sound". Listening to this part of the cantata you involuntarily start imagining the angel horseback riders who have gone mad from the call of a Pre-eternal pipe. It is no longer a prayer for the dead, but terrible reminder about the Last Judgement and fragility of the terrestrial world.
I want to share this brightest and shrill part of the cantata, but, of course, I advise to listen to this work of genius from the beginning  to the end.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-XHIjuUFvo

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THE NUTCRACKER.

Jul. 28th, 2013 | 07:04 pm
posted by: romanovmoshpit in classical_music

can someone please share THE NUTCRACKER music with me?

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great 20th century symphonists

Jun. 17th, 2013 | 05:26 pm
posted by: kalimac in classical_music

Two more entries, somewhat better-known, and very talkative about their works and styles, in my series of great but obscure (to certain values of "obscure") 20th century symphonists. Two quite different guys who've inspired me for decades, Alan Hovhaness and Malcolm Arnold.

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The Greatest 20th Century Symphonists You've Never Heard Of

May. 26th, 2013 | 10:56 am
posted by: kalimac in classical_music

I've started a series of posts on "The Greatest 20th Century Symphonists You've Never Heard Of." For specific values of "you," of course: I suspect many readers on the classical_music list probably already know them. But maybe you don't, and even if you do, maybe you'd enjoy seeing them publicized.

Anyway, the first two posts are up:
1. Kurt Atterberg
2. Cornelis Dopper

Next up, in another couple of days, Joly Braga Santos.

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János Starker, 1924-2013

Apr. 29th, 2013 | 12:38 pm
posted by: marauderosu in classical_music

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-22340113

I even shared a birthday with him. RIP.

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Why I hate opera but love The Barber of Seville

Apr. 27th, 2013 | 02:56 pm
mood: awake
music: Rossini: The Barber of Seville Overture
posted by: marauderosu in classical_music

Let me just make it clear: I HATE opera.

You remember that screech of chalk on the blackboard that gave you goosebumps and made you cringe? A soprano hitting the high notes has the same effect on me. I had tried getting into it many years ago, having liked Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro. But I eventually found myself turned off by the sometimes ridiculous and often overly melodramatic plots as well as the screaming, er, singing. Even my own mother and grandmother kept me turned off of it, describing it as something "that's always in another language and where the singers sound like they're screaming".

Now don't get me wrong. I love classical music. Give me Beethoven's Pastoral, Tchaikovsky's Pathetique, Mahler's Fifth, Shostakovich's Tenth, or some Brahms any day. But I have found one big exception to my operaphobia recently: Rossini's The Barber of Seville. And a big reason has to do with pop culture that I grew up with. Elmer Fudd chased Bugs Bunny around an opera stage to its overture in Rabbit of Seville. A big, fat opera singer kept getting disrupted by Bugs as he was trying to rehearse "Largo al factotum" in Long-Haired Hare. That very same aria was used in many other cartoon shorts as well.

Another reason is because it's comical. This opera was based on a play by Pierre Beaumarchais, and is pretty much a romp throughout. The plot involves the attempt of Count Almaviva to woo the wealthy and beautiful Rosina, yet her guardian, Dr. Bartolo, wishes to marry her himself. Eventually, the Count wins the lady with the help of Figaro, a barber. His schemes create many laughs at the expense of Don Basilio.

Whenever I watch this, I forget that I hate opera. And if I'm ever given the chance to see it performed live, I'll probably give it a go.

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